Behold, a rocket launch seen from space

The perspective on this is quite novel.

  • We've all seen video footage of rocket launches, but this one is spectacularly different: it was filmed from space.
  • Watch the launch and how small it looks from so-called "God's view".

We've all seen several shots of rocket launches from various locations — Cape Canaveral, Houston, Punta Indio, in Argentina, among others. But how many of us have seen such things from space?

Now, you can.

China's Jilin-1 satellite, orbiting 332 miles (535 km) above the Earth, recorded the launching of an OS-X1 suborbital rocket this past weekend. Developed by the private Chinese company OneSpace, the rocket ascended from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gobi Desert. It was a test of its solid fuel boosters, and it's an incredible shot.

Truly god view, Jilin-1 video satellite shot @OneSpace01 OS-X1 suborbital rocket's launch at JSLC this noon. pic.twitter.com/KposRHZc4D
— dafeng cao (@dafengcao) September 7, 2018

Got a question for a real NASA astronomer? Ask it here!

NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller is coming back to Big Think to answer YOUR questions! Here's all you need to know to submit your science-related inquiries.

Videos

Big Think's amazing audience has responded so well to our videos from NASA astronomer and Assistant Director for Science Communication Michelle Thaller that we couldn't wait to bring her back for more!

And this time, she's ready to tackle any questions you're willing to throw at her, like, "How big is the Universe?", "Am I really made of stars?" or, "How long until Elon Musk starts a colony on Mars?"

All you have to do is submit your questions to the form below, and we'll use them for an upcoming Q+A session with Michelle. You know what to do, Big Thinkers!

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CRISPR-edited babies born in China may have enhanced brain functions

The brains of two genetically edited babies born last year in China might have enhanced memory and cognition, but that doesn't mean the scientific community is pleased.

YouTube
Surprising Science
  • In November, Chinese scientist He Jiankui reported that he'd used the CRISPR tool to edit the embryos of two girls.
  • He deleted a gene called CCR5, which allows humans to contract HIV, the virus which causes AIDS.
  • In addition to blocking AIDS, deleting this gene might also have positive effects on memory and cognition. Still, virtually all scientists say we're not ready to use gene-editing technology on babies.
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Easter Island Shows Why Humanity Will Be Extinct Within 100 Years

We’re about to kick off the sixth great extinction event. And we’ll follow shortly after. 

 

The heads of Easter Island.
popular

Like any other system, capitalism has its positive and negative qualities. Inarguably, it has lifted nearly a billion across the globe out of extreme poverty, between 1990 and 2010. But as with other socioeconomic systems of the past, such as with feudalism, a time can come when revolutionary changes make such systems anachronistic. So too has capitalism’s time come, at least the kind which exploits the biosphere.

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One-third of all slavery is visible from space

Advances in satellite imagery are shining a light.

Boyd et al., 2018
Technology & Innovation
  • Today, there are 40.3 million slaves on the planet, more than the number of people living in Canada.
  • Slavery can be hard to find, but it commonly occurs in several key industries like fishing and mining.
  • Using satellite data, researchers and activists are using crowdsourcing and artificial intelligence to identify sites where slavery is taking place.
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