Behold, a rocket launch seen from space

The perspective on this is quite novel.

Screen capture from video posted by Twitter user Dafeng Cao.
Screen capture from video posted by Twitter user Dafeng Cao.
  • We've all seen video footage of rocket launches, but this one is spectacularly different: it was filmed from space.
  • Watch the launch and how small it looks from so-called "God's view".

We've all seen several shots of rocket launches from various locations — Cape Canaveral, Houston, Punta Indio, in Argentina, among others. But how many of us have seen such things from space?

Now, you can.

China's Jilin-1 satellite, orbiting 332 miles (535 km) above the Earth, recorded the launching of an OS-X1 suborbital rocket this past weekend. Developed by the private Chinese company OneSpace, the rocket ascended from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gobi Desert. It was a test of its solid fuel boosters, and it's an incredible shot.

Truly god view, Jilin-1 video satellite shot @OneSpace01 OS-X1 suborbital rocket's launch at JSLC this noon. pic.twitter.com/KposRHZc4D
— dafeng cao (@dafengcao) September 7, 2018

How tiny bioelectronic implants may someday replace pharmaceutical drugs

Scientists are using bioelectronic medicine to treat inflammatory diseases, an approach that capitalizes on the ancient "hardwiring" of the nervous system.

Left: The vagus nerve, the body's longest cranial nerve. Right: Vagus nerve stimulation implant by SetPoint Medical.

Credit: Adobe Stock / SetPoint Medical
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Bioelectronic medicine is an emerging field that focuses on manipulating the nervous system to treat diseases.
  • Clinical studies show that using electronic devices to stimulate the vagus nerve is effective at treating inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Although it's not yet approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, vagus nerve stimulation may also prove effective at treating other diseases like cancer, diabetes and depression.
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U.S. Navy controls inventions that claim to change "fabric of reality"

Inventions with revolutionary potential made by a mysterious aerospace engineer for the U.S. Navy come to light.

U.S. Navy ships

Credit: Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • U.S. Navy holds patents for enigmatic inventions by aerospace engineer Dr. Salvatore Pais.
  • Pais came up with technology that can "engineer" reality, devising an ultrafast craft, a fusion reactor, and more.
  • While mostly theoretical at this point, the inventions could transform energy, space, and military sectors.
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Is it time to decriminalize prostitution? Two New York bills answer yes in unique ways

One bill hopes to repeal the crime of selling sex and expand social services; the other would legalize the entire sex trade.

Credit: Chandan Khanna/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Today in the majority of the United States, it is a crime to sell sex, buy it, or promote its sale.
  • The Sex Trade Survivors Justice & Equality Act would decriminalize prostitution in New York state while maintaining punitive measures against buyers and pimps.
  • Opponents suggest this law would only push the illegal sex trade further underground and seek full decriminalization for everyone involved.
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    Physicist creates AI algorithm that may prove reality is a simulation

    A physicist creates an AI algorithm that predicts natural events and may prove the simulation hypothesis.

    Pixellated head simulation.

    Credit: Adobe Stock
    Surprising Science
    • Princeton physicist Hong Qin creates an AI algorithm that can predict planetary orbits.
    • The scientist partially based his work on the hypothesis which believes reality is a simulation.
    • The algorithm is being adapted to predict behavior of plasma and can be used on other natural phenomena.
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