Colin Kaepernick is the new face of Nike's 'Just Do It' campaign

"Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. #JustDoIt"

Colin Kaepernick for Nike, Just Do It campaign.
Credit: Nike

When former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick announced via Twitter that he's the new spokesperson for Nike and is featured in its new ad campaign, social media dove in and—no surprise to anyone—was very opinionated. The announcement drove Nike stock prices down slightly, but they are heading back up.


First, here's Kap's initial Tweet, which ... yeah, in less than 24 hours, 635,000 likes. 

Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. #JustDoIt pic.twitter.com/SRWkMIDdaO

— Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) September 3, 2018

And one of the pushback Tweets.

First the @NFL forces me to choose between my favorite sport and my country. I chose country. Then @Nike forces me to choose between my favorite shoes and my country. Since when did the American Flag and the National Anthem become offensive? pic.twitter.com/4CVQdTHUH4

— Sean Clancy (@sclancy79) September 3, 2018

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