Brad Templeton, Who Started the World’s First Dotcom, on Why Bitcoin Matters

Bitcoin is just one example of how exponential technology is putting the reins of finance in the hands of individuals and small businesses. 

Brad Templeton, Who Started the World’s First Dotcom, on Why Bitcoin Matters


Big Think is once again proud to partner with fellow big thinkers Singularity University to share the news about their 2015 Exponential Finance conference, happening June 2nd and 3rd in New York City. The conference will feature Big Think Experts such as Ray Kurzweil, Chance Barnett, and Brad Templeton. 

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Sometimes, in spite of the incredible speed with which we can use the tech at our fingertips to find the information we’re looking for — hail a taxi, book a vacation, and wire money across the world — it’s easy to forget how fast things are changing, and that every day entire industries are being disrupted by some new startup.

For Brad Templeton, the founder and architect of the first-ever entirely web-based business, ClariNet, Bitcoin and other virtual currencies are significant in that they take some aspects of finance that were formerly in the hands of professionals and unlock them for the public at large. Now anyone can be a banker. And in the future, the extent to which this is the case will expand exponentially. Back in 1990, with a four-track home recorder, an aspiring musician could make a few low-fi demo tracks. Today, you can produce an entire album on an iPad. The case of finance is analogous, with Bitcoin and crowdfunding platforms paving the way and even bigger changes to come. 

Understanding these kinds of exponential changes in advance is a major advantage for individuals and businesses that want to stay a step (or 100 steps) ahead of their peers. And Singularity University’s 2015 Exponential Finance conference, happening June 2nd and 3rd in New York City, brings together some of the top future-focused entrepreneurs in every field: from finance, to law, to computing, to medicine, to share their discoveries and insights into what’s coming next, and how to turn it to your advantage.

Tickets are going fast. Use the code BIGTHINK500 to lock in your seats now, at a $500 discount.


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