The Kids Are Not Alright. Stop Measuring Them All the Time.

Psychologist Madeline Levine offers savvy advice for courageous parenting at different stages of a child's education.

 

The Kids Are Not Alright. Stop Measuring Them All the Time.

As a psychologist, Madeline Levine has seen firsthand how children today are unraveling under pressure. In order to "succeed," children take stimulants to study or cheat regularly to maintain their grades. They also resort to unhealthy ways of coping with anxiety such as substance abuse or self-mutilation. What the heck are we doing to our kids?


What's the Big Idea?

We're hyper-parenting them. At every level of their educational development we are subjecting them to strict measurements. 

"We need to embrace a healthier and radically different way of thinking about success," Levine argues in her book, Teach Your Children Well: Parenting for Authentic Success. We celebrate what is obvious and measurable over everything else. This is debilitating to children in precisely the same way that it is debilitating to parents. It is debilitating to everyone.  

Levine argues for a different approach which she calls "courageous parenting." If your child hasn't learned to read in kindergarten, don't freak out. Development is a process, and it is doesn’t happen at the same pace for everyone. Have the courage to let your child experiment and play. We overload our children with homework, even though we know that about one hour is really the right amount. 

What's the Significance?

Teach Your Children Well offers savvy advice for courageous parenting at different stages of a child's education. Therefore, the lessons span from "remembering to play" to "building independence" to "becoming an adult thinker."

You can apply Levine's underlying concept to your own adult life. Courageous parenting is related to the idea of permanent beta, that is, being a lifelong learner. You need to embrace the process of learning and developing skills, not just the outcome. And it is absolutely alright (in fact you should be encouraged) to go at your own pace. 

Watch the video here:

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Credit: fergregory via Adobe Stock
Surprising Science
  • Australian scientists found that bodies kept moving for 17 months after being pronounced dead.
  • Researchers used photography capture technology in 30-minute intervals every day to capture the movement.
  • This study could help better identify time of death.
Keep reading Show less

Meet the worm with a jaw of metal

Metal-like materials have been discovered in a very strange place.

Credit: Mike Workman/Adobe Stock
Personal Growth
  • Bristle worms are odd-looking, spiky, segmented worms with super-strong jaws.
  • Researchers have discovered that the jaws contain metal.
  • It appears that biological processes could one day be used to manufacture metals.
Keep reading Show less

Don't be rude to your doctor. It might kill you.

Dealing with rudeness can nudge you toward cognitive errors.

Photo by Jonathan Borba from Pexels
Surprising Science
  • Anchoring is a common bias that makes people fixate on one piece of data.
  • A study showed that those who experienced rudeness were more likely to anchor themselves to bad data.
  • In some simulations with medical students, this effect led to higher mortality rates.
Keep reading Show less
Strange Maps

Welcome to the United Fonts of America

At least 222 typefaces are named after places in the U.S. — and there's still room for more.

Quantcast