We're Born to Learn, Then We Forget | a G+ Hangout with Ellen Galinsky

Has the age of zero-sum competition come to an end? Can we learn to recognize collaborative learning as our primary task from cradle to grave?


In this G+ hangout for Big Think Mentor, Ellen Galinsky, author of Mind in the Making, joins Big Think editor Jason Gots and Big Think Mentor members Patrick Johnson and Christian Grieco to discuss the "seven essential life skills" -- the sum of decades of research into how we humans learn and thrive throughout the lifespan.

Watch the video: 

Why women make businesses more profitable

When it comes to the workplace, more diversity means more money.

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Culture & Religion
  • While the workplace is slowly diversifying, some industries have been slow to change.
  • A growing body of research is uncovering that workplaces with greater diversity actual perform better. One of the clearest examples of this effect is in venture capitalism, where nearly all venture capitalists are white, male, Harvard graduates.
  • When VC firms hire more women, their effectiveness and profitability explodes.
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An end to suffering: 10 quotes on Buddhist philosophy

It's not what you have, it's what you do with it.

Personal Growth
  • Buddhism has been applied differently across the planet as it enters new cultures.
  • The underlying philosophical foundation is applicable to diverse situations, whether religious or secular.
  • But it is a practice, not a belief, and must be treated as a discipline for retraining consciousness.
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The Geminid meteor peaks Thursday night. Here’s how to view it best.

The Geminid meteor shower grows more intense with every year, and it's expected to be particularly bright in 2018.

Google
Surprising Science
  • Look up at the skies from 2 to 7:30 a.m. on December 14 to see the most meteors.
  • To get the best view, travel away from city lights, avoid looking at your phone and let your eyes adjust to the dark.
  • Stargazers might also be able to catch a glimpse of a comet making a rare appearance, NASA astronomers say.
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