LIVE NOW: The 'inspiration gap' kills innovation. How can we do better?

Join two-time NBA champion Shane Battier live at 1 pm ET this Monday.

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What is the inspiration gap? Inspiration comes in many forms: successful role models who went before us, positive words and coaching from the people in our lives, even the act of setting a goal for ourselves and sticking to it. But inspiration is in some ways a luxury. The financial, familial, and infrastructure constraints that children in at-risk communities face every day must, by necessity, come first. Without inspiration, innovation stalls—and the trek up Maslow's hierarchy becomes insurmountably steep.

Two-time NBA champion Shane Battier believes addressing the inspiration gap is crucial to breaking this cycle and uplifting the most vulnerable communities. In this Big Think Live session, moderated by Bob Kulhan, Battier expands on how that same inspiration gap can also be found hindering innovation in our organizations. So how can we, as community leaders and team leaders, inspire the people around us and drive innovation at all levels?

Shane Battier embodies the adept skill set, and acute awareness of others, to the point of being recognized as the ultimate team player. He has stood tall amongst fellow giants as a player for the NBA 13 seasons. He still remains an influential part of the NBA as Vice President of Development and Analytics for the Miami HEAT. His admirable dedication to his community and education have come through with the founding of The Battier Take Charge Foundation, along with his wife, Heidi Battier, which aims to provide resources for the development and education of underserved youth and teens.

Bob Kulhan is an elite improviser, an adjunct professor at Duke Fuqua B-School, author of Getting to "Yes And", and the founder and CEO of Business Improv® – a 21-year-old consultancy linking improvisation to business through behavioral sciences and ROI for blue chip companies. BI is a world-class leader in experiential Virtual Instructor-Led Training (VILT) Digital Asynchronous Learning and Open Enrollment programs.


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