Malcolm Gladwell: What if presidents were chosen by lottery?

Join Radiolab's Latif Nasser at 1pm ET today as he chats with Malcolm Gladwell live on Big Think.

Can voters really predict who will be a good leader? Malcolm Gladwell joins Big Think Live to discuss this how lotteries could, in theory, distribute leadership more effectively, from government elections, college admissions, and grant applications.


In this live stream, you'll learn:

    • How Malcolm Gladwell thinks through the programming for his podcast Revisionist History, and how the coronavirus pandemic affected the show
    • Why the premise that voters can predict who will be a good leader may be a poor one
    • How a lottery system might affect government elections, college admissions, and grant applications—in theory
    • Why the distinction between holding office and running for office is key
    • About the storytelling value that can be derived from deliberately leaving questions open ended
    • + get Gladwell's take on fake news and discover the one book her believes every student should read

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    • The British Empire went to war over tea, ultimately losing its American colonies and twice beating the Chinese in the "Opium Wars."
    • The British desire to secure homegrown tea resulted in their sending botanist Robert Fortune on a Hollywood-worthy mission to secure Chinese tea plants and steal horticultural secrets.
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