LIVE JUNE 30 | Happiness hack: Approach life like an Italian chef

If you're interested in reinvention and adaptability, turns out Italian cooking is an instruction manual for life.

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What does an adaptive and inventive life look like? Well, it looks a lot like Italian cooking. Tuscan chef Gabriele Corcos and American actor Debi Mazar bring their creative forces to Big Think Live to discuss risk-taking, career pivoting, and why your approach to food can be an instruction manual for reinvention, love and family.

Ask your questions during the live Q&A!

Join at 1pm ET on Tuesday June 30. Streaming via YouTube and Facebook, and via Big Think Edge (for subscribers only).

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