Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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from the world's big
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Remind your mom that she's your rock. Give her 12 months of life-changing learning.

If the apple didn't fall far from the tree, this is a gift your mom will actually want.

  • Get a 1-year subscription to Big Think Edge for your mom this Mother's Day! A subscription unlocks our premium learning platform – and it's 50% off until May 15.
  • Moms have given us decades of support, but who is supporting her? Our library of world-class experts will teach her skills and lessons that make her even stronger and smarter.

When we're kids, if we're lucky, our parents teach us how to push back against self-pity, self-judgment, and defeatism. "You can do it!" they remind us. "Don't be so hard on yourself!"

The ability to recognize, contain, and reverse the tide of negative self-talk is an essential survival skill, and it's something we have to learn over and over again.

With Mother's Day approaching, we're thinking about...who else? Mom. And wondering who's there to remind her how strong and how valuable she is. If she's lucky, you're there. And if she's extra bonus lucky, so is Big Think Edge.

Now through May 15th, in honor of moms everywhere and in support of their lifelong learning, a year's subscription to Edge is 50% off. It's a priceless companion on your mom's ongoing journey. And it's almost as good company as you are!

Former Navy SEAL David Goggins teaches just one of the many life and career skills Big Think Edge offers—skills that can support your mom in achieving lifelong goals, calming anxiety, getting a second career or a side hustle on track, and much more.

Never stop learning

Big Think Edge adds new videos every week so our subscribers can keep learning. Watch world-class doers and thinkers like podcaster and author Gretchen Rubin, actor Bryan Cranston, and Harvard professor Linda Hill teach the most important skills of the 21st century, in the palm of your hand. Here is a small glimpse of our vast library of lessons:

SUBSCRIBE NOW TO
GET 50% OFF FOR MOTHER'S DAY.

Offer expires May 15.

Neom, Saudi Arabia's $500 billion megacity, reaches its next phase

Construction of the $500 billion dollar tech city-state of the future is moving ahead.

Credit: Neom
Technology & Innovation
  • The futuristic megacity Neom is being built in Saudi Arabia.
  • The city will be fully automated, leading in health, education and quality of life.
  • It will feature an artificial moon, cloud seeding, robotic gladiators and flying taxis.
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Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

Are we genetically inclined for superstition or just fearful of the truth?

Videos
  • From secret societies to faked moon landings, one thing that humanity seems to have an endless supply of is conspiracy theories. In this compilation, physicist Michio Kaku, science communicator Bill Nye, psychologist Sarah Rose Cavanagh, skeptic Michael Shermer, and actor and playwright John Cameron Mitchell consider the nature of truth and why some groups believe the things they do.
  • "I think there's a gene for superstition, a gene for hearsay, a gene for magic, a gene for magical thinking," argues Kaku. The theoretical physicist says that science goes against "natural thinking," and that the superstition gene persists because, one out of ten times, it actually worked and saved us.
  • Other theories shared include the idea of cognitive dissonance, the dangerous power of fear to inhibit critical thinking, and Hollywood's romanticization of conspiracies. Because conspiracy theories are so diverse and multifaceted, combating them has not been an easy task for science.

COVID-19 brain study to explore long-term effects of the virus

A growing body of research suggests COVID-19 can cause serious neurological problems.

Brain images of a patient with acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis.

Coronavirus
  • The new study seeks to track the health of 50,000 people who have tested positive for COVID-19.
  • The study aims to explore whether the disease causes cognitive impairment and other conditions.
  • Recent research suggests that COVID-19 can, directly or indirectly, cause brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage and other neurological problems.
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Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation

Better reskilling can future-proof jobs in the age of automation. Enter SkillUp's new coalition.

Coronavirus layoffs are a glimpse into our automated future. We need to build better education opportunities now so Americans can find work in the economy of tomorrow.

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