Steal from your heroes: John Cleese on Big Think Edge

Put a comedic stamp on your work – like this.

  • John Cleese teaches a video lesson for Big Think Edge called "Make Your Mark with Humor".
  • The Monty Python alumni and comedy legend has some unexpected advice to get your creativity out of your mind and onto the page.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge to reach new creative and analytical heights.

Who better to show you the ropes of comedy than Monty Python alumni John Cleese?

Humor is valuable in its own right. It's also a perfect tool for connecting with others and communicating almost any point, whether it's at work, in social circles, or at home. When we're laughing, our senses are fully engaged—we tend to listen better and to remember what we're hearing. Not everybody can be a comedian, but as the British comedy troupe Monty Python's massive success illustrates, you can take a clinical approach to figure out what's funny.

Subscribe to Big Think Edge and you'll learn first-hand from comedy legend John Cleese how to start writing, stop the crickets chirping, and approach creativity – oddly enough – with clinical precision.

Put a comedic stamp on your work

John Cleese teaches "Make Your Mark with Humor" as part of Big Think Edge's 9-part Boost Your Creative Intelligence learning path. In less than five minutes, you'll come away with actionable ways (all field tested by the Monty Python gang!) to bring your work to life with humor, and to see your all-time favorite comedians and actors in a way you've never considered them before.

It is so difficult at the beginning, particularly as a writer, to do good written comedy that I suggest, at the start, that you steal or borrow – or as the artist would say "are influenced by" – anything that you think that is really good and really funny.
— John Cleese

Retire the rubber chicken and subscribe to Big Think Edge to reach your true creative height.

Boost your creative intelligence

In spite of all the scary movies, artificial intelligence is not yet poised to take over everybody's job. But what radically differentiates us humans from even the most cutting edge machine intelligence is creativity. We have an ability, apparently unique in nature, to imaginatively break apart and reassemble the world in novel ways. While some are born with more natural talent in one creative area or another, creative thinking is a teachable skill. A set of skills, in fact, from intuition-testing to improvisation to collaborative brainstorming. In Big Think Edge's Boost Your Creative Intelligence learning path, you'll learn them from the best.

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