For Diversity Training, Identify Your Organization’s Stage

How comfortable do your employees feel at work? The answer to that question impacts your bottom line. The more comfortable and appreciated your employees feel, the more productive and invested they are in the organization.


Jennifer Brown, a management expert who helps top companies, advises how to make your organization stronger with diversity training in the latest installment of Big Think’s Edge.

What’s Your Organization’s Stage?

Company cultures of course vary. Some companies are ahead of the game when it comes to diversity training. Their employees know that they can be themselves at work and that there are peer networks to help them with career development and mentoring.

But maybe your organization is at a different stage. In order to introduce the type of diversity training your company needs, Brown says that you need to identify your organization’s stage.

Know the Different Types of Stages

The first stage of diversity training, according to Brown, is the awareness building stage. She also calls this the “teaching stage” for helping organizations learn about diversity training and its many benefits for strengthening teams and motivating employees. “It is embodied usually in training initiatives where everyone goes through something or at least all managers go through an experience in a learning experience together,” explains Brown.

The Benefits of Advanced Stages

Once your organization is introduced to diversity training, it will start to advance to higher levels and establish diverse networks. Brown explains: “They start to leverage their understanding of diversity to drive recruitment, to drive the retention of key talent through professional development programs for that talent. They start to look at their pipeline and see whether all the education and awareness they’ve done is actually manifesting in the presence of more diverse talent.”

By retaining talent and creating a more diverse workforce, you’re strengthening your organization. As we’ve mentioned before here on Big Think’s Edge, diverse groups lead to better decision-making, according to economist Tim Harford.

For more from Brown on how your organization can grow from diversity training, watch the latest installment of Big Think’s Edge and subscribe to Edge today.

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