​There are two kinds of failure – but only one is honorable

Malcolm Gladwell teaches "Get over yourself and get to work" for Big Think Edge.

  • Learn to recognize failure and know the big difference between panicking and choking.
  • At Big Think Edge, Malcolm Gladwell teaches how to check your inner critic and get clear on what failure is.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge to access the best learning online.

As Malcolm Gladwell – author of numerous New York Times bestselling books – points out, mastery and popularity are sometimes linked, but often they are not. If your goal is to become masterful at what you do, the formula is really quite simple: Stay focused and do your time. This is the theory behind the '10,000 hours' rule that Gladwell made famous. Worrying about whether you're being recognized for your efforts, i.e. popularity, is a product of the ego, not to mention a distraction... so get over yourself and get to work!

Subscribe to Big Think Edge to learn first-hand from Malcolm Gladwell about the two types of failure and why it is so valuable to be able to tell them apart.

Check your inner critic, Malcolm Gladwell style

Failure is a spectrum. At one end is "the kind of failure that afflicts people who are good at what they do and the other is the kind of failure that afflicts people who are inexperienced, who are not good at what they do," says Gladwell.

Gladwell teaches "Get over yourself and get to work" for Big Think Edge. This valuable lesson is one everyone should hear: It will help diagnose your feelings about failure as well as the root cause, either freeing you up to move forward productively, or putting you on a course to avoid failure a second time.

Subscribe to Big Think Edge to learn high-value skills from experts like Malcolm Gladwell, John Cleese, Bryan Cranston, Liv Boeree, Sallie Krawcheck, Nick Offerman + more.

3D printing might save your life one day. It's transforming medicine and health care.

What can 3D printing do for medicine? The "sky is the limit," says Northwell Health researcher Dr. Todd Goldstein.

Northwell Health
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Medical professionals are currently using 3D printers to create prosthetics and patient-specific organ models that doctors can use to prepare for surgery.
  • Eventually, scientists hope to print patient-specific organs that can be transplanted safely into the human body.
  • Northwell Health, New York State's largest health care provider, is pioneering 3D printing in medicine in three key ways.
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The psychology of moral grandstanding

Moral grandstanding is a vanity project that sabotages public discourse says moral philosopher Brandon Warmke.

Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies
  • Moral grandstanding is the use of moral talk for self-promotion. Moral grandstanders have egotistical motives: they may want to signal that they have superhuman insight into a topic, paint themselves as a victim, or show that they care more than others.
  • Moral philosophers view moral grandstanding as a net negative. They argue that it contributes to political polarization, increases levels of cynicism about moral talk and its value in public life, and it causes outrage exhaustion.
  • Grandstanders are also a kind of social free rider, says Brandon Warmke. They get the benefits of being heard without contributing to any valuable discourse. It's selfish behavior at best, and divisive behavior at worst.
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Following sex, some men have unexpected feelings – study

A new study shows that some men's reaction to sex is not what you'd expect, resulting in a condition previously observed in women.

Credit: Pixabay
Sex & Relationships
  • A new study shows men's feelings after sex can be complex.
  • Some men reportedly get sad and upset.
  • The condition affected 41% of men in the study
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Study: Taking a break – even for 10 seconds – helps your brain learn

You wouldn't think even a 10-second break would help, but it does.

Mind & Brain
  • A study finds that even short breaks help you solidify new learning.
  • In a way, learning really only happens during your breaks.
  • For the most effective learning sessions, build-in short rest periods.
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