Diversity Training Makes Your Organization Stronger

Are you using all of the brain power in your organization? Your people are one of your greatest assets. How well are you helping them achieve their potential, and therefore your organization’s full potential?


In the latest installment of Big Think’s Edge, management expert Jennifer Brown explains why diversity training is essential to your organization.

Inclusion:

We hear a lot about diversity training, but hardly anyone talks about the value it brings. The most important aspect of diversity training for helping harness the power of an organization is inclusion. Are you leading inclusively?

“Inclusion is really a learned behavior and it starts with awareness,” explains Brown. “So the kinds of training initiatives and the content within those really help people become comfortable with those behaviors. It’s the language, it’s the mindset, and it’s really developing the habit of leading inclusively.”

Closing the Door:

Diversity training gives your employees a safe place to openly and productively discuss their unique perspectives of being a part of the organization. This is critical for making employees comfortable in the organization and therefore more connected with their colleagues and the organization’s vision.

Closed-door sessions allow different communities—women, LGBT, and other minorities—to come together and build connections.

The Network Effect:

Again and again, studies show that the source of our happiness comes from the quality of our relationships. Strong networks benefit us in terms of quality of life and how productive we can be. By helping your employees build strong networks you're really helping your organization succeed.

By providing a safe place for different groups of people to unite in their shared identities the organization becomes stronger as a whole. Your employees are shown that they are valuable to the company and this motivates them.

“It not only engages and motivates, but I think that it sheds some light on their peer network as well and who’s available to them in all places in the company in terms of mentoring and connections that might be there to support them,” explains Brown.

For more on Brown’s insights into how diversity training can make your organization stronger, watch this clip from the latest installment of Big Think’s Edge:

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