How to make the most of meetings, with Tim Ferriss, Elon Musk, and Carson Tate

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  • What are subscribers learning this week? Tim Ferriss explains why the smartest person in the room may be the person least afraid to look dumb.
  • In one of our Deep Dives, learn how the quality of our future lives will depend on the answers to 3 technology questions.
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Successful people tend to have a couple of everyday superpowers for breaking through, says podcaster Tim Ferriss, whose lesson for Big Think Edge this week reveals where you can get yours.

Lawyer and therapist Bill Eddy charts through the jungle of amped-up, and conflicting, news coverage we face every day. Tech entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa proposes a framework for balancing the benefits and perils of technology that will change the way you look at humanity's future.

You'll also learn to put Elon Musk's unorthodox meeting philosophy into practice to change the way you attend, and run, meetings forever.

All this and more is coming to Big Think Edge this week!

Become the smartest person in the room: Develop superpowers by investigating what others won't, with Tim Ferriss

Photo: Shutterstock

Author and entrepreneur Tim Ferriss interviews a wide range of luminaries on his business podcast, many of whom employ a pair of odd techniques: These people are not afraid to ask dumb questions, and they appreciate the value of absurd ideas. Dumb questions, Ferriss explains, often aren't really so dumb, and absurd ideas can be eye-opening as a way of shaking up your thinking. From building his own career, Ferriss vouches for both strategies, and he presents some persuasive evidence that you should give them a try.

Available September 9 in Boost Your Professional Intelligence

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Get past crises, evil villains, and superheroes: Essential questions for screening fake news, with Bill Eddy

We live in an era in which conflicts regularly occur between people operating from completely different sets of "facts." It's largely because we take in great gulps of (mis)information as we spin from one crisis to another, feverishly reported by news outlets and individuals whose success depends on keeping us in a state of near-panic. Author of Why We Elect Narcissists and Sociopaths Bill Eddy has some questions you can ask yourself that will help you separate the fake news from the real.

Available September 11 in Boost Your Analytic Intelligence

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Evaluate future possibilities: 3 lenses for analyzing the potential of disruptive technologies, with Vivek Wadhwa

Our technology-driven future will be amazing. Or terrifying. Probably both, if its development is left to chance as it has been so far. As Paul Simon wrote in 1986, "These are the days of miracles and wonders, and don't cry, baby, don't cry." Vivek Wadhwa is the author of The Driver in the Driverless Car, and he's watching the road ahead. He suggests a reset and a more careful consideration of the future we're building before it's upon us. The answers to three questions, he asserts, can help us get there safely, equitably, and together.

Available September 12 in Boost Your Analytical Intelligence

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Elon Musk’s 3 Rules for Effective Meetings

Photo: Shutterstock/Big Think Edge

In a world where time is money, how do you make the most of the meetings you attend? Or if you're the one calling the meeting, how do you make sure it doesn't suck? Working smarter rather than harder means questioning the format of existing routines.

Entrepreneur Elon Musk has disrupted multiple industries, but that all started with disrupting his own organizations: This week, we dive into his 3 rules for running smarter meetings, and pair his insights with productivity expert Carson Tate to bring you customizable strategies for making your meetings magic.

Available September 9 in Deep Dives

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