Start your 7-day free trial! Sign up today.

Join Big Think's premium video learning platform, Big Think Edge, and learn skills that will propel your life and career.

  • A former clandestine operative reveals a CIA method for reading an adversary's mind.
  • Game theory exposes the two best tactics for winning a negotiation.
  • If you're not a subscriber yet, join Big Think Edge today. Boost your analytical intelligence with our 7-day free trial.



This week, Big Think Edge is releasing three videos about getting inside the heads of people you need to understand better. Jamie Notter clears up what many people don't understand about millennials, Amaryllis Fox shares a great CIA technique for predicting an adversary's behavior, and Kevin Zollman puts you on top in negotiations.

Preparing for the millennial takeover: Understand the four trends that shaped a generation, with Jamie Notter

Maybe you're a millennial. Maybe you've been baffled by them. In either case, there's no denying the friction that often arises in the workplace between millennials and those who came before them. The insights of Jamie Notter, author of When Millennials Take Over, should resolve confusion and friction on all sides. Why are millennials the way they are? Notter's astute, eye-opening analysis of the world millennials know explains everything.

Available September 3 in Become a Better Manager

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Win with red teaming: A case study in strategic empathy from inside the CIA, with Amaryllis Fox

To win in a conflict, it's imperative to see your adversary clearly. It's not always easy to do, especially when dealing with entrenched opposing mindsets, and in the 1980s the CIA developed "red teaming" to address this. Former clandestine CIA operative Amaryllis Fox explains how a "red cell" of CIA operatives were charged with getting inside the minds of Soviet leadership as deeply as possible, non-judgmentally assuming both their tactical and emotional perspectives. It proved to be an invaluable means of predicting their behavior. Stepping outside yourself to spend some time in an opponent's skin, explains Fox, is not only a great way to accomplish your goals — it's also a powerful personal-growth experience. Learn how to do it this week, at Big Think Edge.

"THE TRUTH IS, YOU ACTUALLY ARE FAR BETTER EQUIPPED TO GO AFTER THE PRAGMATIC, STRATEGIC WIN WHEN YOU KNOW HOW TO EXERCISE EMPATHY, AND CLIMB INTO THE PERSPECTIVE OF ANOTHER PERSON, PARTICULARLY YOUR ADVERSARY."

– AMARYLLIS FOX

Available September 4 in Boost Your Emotional Intelligence

SUBSCRIBE NOW

The science of strategic thinking: Improve negotiation outcomes with 2 central principles from game theory, with Kevin Zollman

Game theorist and author of The Game Theorist's Guide to Parenting Kevin Zollman talks about how game theory tries to explain negotiations. It identifies simple principles that underlie what seems on the surface to be complex interaction. Two of these principles just happen to be the ones that typically determine whether you or the other person is going to win. Hint: They both involve positioning yourself to seem like the person who has the least to lose. Time to level-up your negotiating skills. Start your 7-day free trial of Big Think Edge to watch this lesson.

Available September 4 in Boost Your Analytical Intelligence

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Big Think Edge releases Deep Dives!

This week marks a brand-new offering on the Big Think Edge platform: Deep Dives! Big Think Edge Deep Dives are four-step educational experiences that are made up of articles, videos, and activities. We'll be releasing three Deep Dives every week so there's more than ever to learn on Big Think Edge.

Our first three Deep Dives explain why Donald Trump, the "Disruptor in Chief", might be onto something when it comes to so-called dark emotional intelligence in negotiations; we look at how to welcome Gen Z into your strong intergenerational team; and you'll also learn how to use practical framework for making life's toughest decisions.



More From Big Think Edge
Related Articles

Liberal and Conservative brains react to charged words differently

Partisanship can be seen in brain scans now.

Image by Raman Oza from Pixabay
Mind & Brain
  • A new study shows brain activity differs between liberals and conservatives when they watch political videos.
  • Brain activity differed between partisans when words tied to emotions, morality, or threats were used.
  • The findings could help us understand how partisans process information, perhaps leading to new ways to bridging the divide.
Keep reading Show less

Coffee and green tea may lower death risk for some adults

Tea and coffee have known health benefits, but now we know they can work together.


Credit: NIKOLAY OSMACHKO from Pexels
Surprising Science
  • A new study finds drinking large amounts of coffee and tea lowers the risk of death in some adults by nearly two thirds.
  • This is the first study to suggest the known benefits of these drinks are additive.
  • The findings are great, but only directly apply to certain people.
Keep reading Show less

'Magic square' math puzzle has gone unsolved since 1996

Think you can solve it? One mathematician has already offered about $1,000 and a bottle of champagne to whoever cracks it first.

pxfuel.com
Mind & Brain
  • The puzzle involves a particularly complicated type of magic square.
  • Magic squares are square arrays containing distinct numbers, and the sums of the numbers in the columns, rows and diagonals must be equal.
  • In 1996, the recreational mathematics writer Martin Gardner offered $100 to whoever could solve a 3x3 magic square — but using squared numbers.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast