5 Minute Drill: How to Negotiate Like a Pro

People have the tendency in negotiation to focus on the facts and the figures, ignoring the emotional component. 

In today's lesson, Dan Shapiro describes the value of creating a positive and more productive work environment, and lays out 5 core emotional concerns of employees that need to be met in order to accomplish this. This lesson is derived from Big Think Edge, an online learning platform designed to help employees help their companies cultivate the new skills and knowledge necessary to invent new products, new markets, new business models, and new industries.


Shapiro tells us that people have the tendency in negotiation to focus on the facts and the figures, ignoring the emotional component.  Together with his colleague, Roger Fisher, Shapiro has boiled down an employee's "complex sea of emotions" into a handful of things that he calls Core Concerns -- matters that are important to all of us. "Your ability to deal with these core concerns, five of them, will bring you power," Shapiro says.  

1. Appreciation. Do you feel appreciated by that other person in the negotiation?  And. . . . Do you think they’re feeling appreciated by you?

2. Autonomy.  Autonomy is the freedom to make decisions without somebody else imposing a decision on you.  You walk in to that negotiation and you tell that other party, “Here’s the proposal; take it or leave it.”  Guess what they’re more likely to do?  To leave it.  It has nothing to do with the rationality of the negotiation; it has everything to do with the process. with whether that other person’s autonomy feels respected or imposed upon, impinged upon.

3. Affiliation.  Rather than taking the adversarial positional approach, consider what the emotional connection is like between you and the other person or group?  

4. Status. Who feels respected for their status? Who feels disrespected?  "As the only female in this room, what’s your perspective?”  Not cool. Respect people’s status.  

5. Role.  Do people have a meaningful role in the negotiation? "You have great power to actually structure the roles that you play and the others play in the negotiation to help you reach some sort of mutual gains," Shapiro says, "where you both are better off than you otherwise could be."

So before your next negotiation, Shapiro's recommendation is to walk through these five core concerns.  It doesn't need to take more than five minutes. But here's the advantage you will gain. "Before your next negotiation you already know five things about that other person," says Shapiro. That means you will walk in much more prepared, and ultimately a more powerful negotiator.

For expert video content to inspire, engage and motivate your employees, visit Big Think Edge

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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