Tenure-Track Position in Science, Environmental, and/or Health Journalism: American University, Washington DC



This semester, I am serving on the search committee for an exciting new tenure track position in science, environmental, and/or health journalism. Our School of Communication at American University is a leading laboratory for professional education, research, and innovation in the fields of journalism, public communication, and film and digital media. The new faculty member would have the opportunity to train the next generation of science, environmental, and health reporters while working in Washington, DC on innovative projects that address major trends and challenges in the field.

See the job listing below.

American University School of Communication
Tenure Track Position in
Health/Science/Environmental Journalism

The nationally accredited Journalism program of The School of Communication at American University, Washington, D.C., is seeking an experienced journalist with a strong record/expertise in health, science, and/or environmental journalism for a tenure-track position beginning in August 2010. The successful applicant could have additional business, government, and/or public policy expertise. There is a four-course teaching load in the first year. Teaching will include a specialty course in science/environmental/health reporting, and other news writing/reporting and/or media studies courses. Strong skills in computer-assisted reporting, multimedia experience with knowledge of Web-based writing and software, and an interest in working on externally funded projects are highly desirable. A path-breaking research agenda is required. Teaching will include both undergraduate and graduate courses and may also include the School's weekend graduate programs.

Qualifications: Candidates should have substantial professional experience, a master's degree or Ph.D., and demonstrated potential for nationally prominent scholarly, professional, or creative work. Prior teaching experience at the university level is preferred, as is a record of top-notch research. Responsibilities also include service on departmental and university committees, and leadership in professional and academic groups.

Submit application letter, resume or vitae, transcripts and names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references to Dr. W. Joseph Campbell, Chair, Science/Environmental/Health Journalism Search Committee, School of Communication, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, MGC #300, Washington, D.C. 20016-8017.
Inquiries to socsearch@american.edu.

Review of applications will begin Sept. 1, 2009, and continue until the position is filled.

Rank and Salary: The successful candidate will be appointed at the rank of Assistant Professor. Candidates with established teaching and research track records may be considered at a higher rank. Salary is competitive and negotiable, and is dependent upon qualifications and experience.

The School of Communication has more than 900 undergraduate and 300 graduate students in journalism, film & media arts, and public communication programs. American University is an independent, co-educational university with more than 11,000 students. SOC is a laboratory for professional education, communication research, and innovative production in journalism, film and media arts, and public communication. The School works across media platforms with a focus on public affairs and public service. For more information about the School of Communication, please visit http://www.american.edu/soc.

The American University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to a diverse faculty, staff and student body. Applications from women and minorities are particularly invited.


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