Proximity as Bias in Coverage of the World's Hurricane Problem

Over at The Intersection, Chris Mooney has a post up about the complete absence of U.S. news coverage dedicated to the record six tropical cyclones that have hit Madagascar, killing hundreds and causing massive damage.

It's the old proximity norm creating bias in news coverage. The result, apart from any important disaster relief reaction, is that Americans fail to get a big picture about just how global the hurricane problem might be.


Six tropical cyclones hit Madagascar over the past couple months, but you wouldn't know it if you lived in the U.S.

Related Articles

Wider-faced politicians are seen as more corrupt

New research offers a tip for politicians who don’t want to be seen as corrupt: don’t get a big head.

Researchers at Caltech discovered that wide-faced politicians are seen as more corrupt. (Keystone/Getty Images)
popular
  • New research offers a tip for politicians who don't want to be seen as corrupt: don't get a big head.
  • A new study showed people photos of politicians and asked them to rate how corruptible each seemed.
  • The results were published this week in Psychological Science by researchers at Caltech.
Keep reading Show less
Playlists
Keep reading Show less

Five foods that increase your psychological well-being

These five main food groups are important for your brain's health and likely to boost the production of feel-good chemicals.

Mind & Brain

We all know eating “healthy” food is good for our physical health and can decrease our risk of developing diabetes, cancer, obesity and heart disease. What is not as well known is that eating healthy food is also good for our mental health and can decrease our risk of depression and anxiety.

Keep reading Show less