ON THURS: Harvard Panel with Andrew Revkin

A reminder for readers in Boston and Cambridge: Thursday this week I will be a panelist on a discussion about climate change and the media at the Kennedy School of Government. Details are below and at this link. Audio of the panel discussion will be archived online and I will post a link when available.

The big draw, of course, will be fellow panelist Andrew Revkin, making one of his first public appearances since taking a buyout from his full time position at the New York Times.


The Public Divide over Climate Change: Science, Skeptics and the Media

Seminar
Series: ENRP Seminar
Open to the Public - Nye B, Fifth Floor Taubman Building
February 4, 2010
12:00-2:00 p.m.

Moderator: Cristine Russell

Description:

First in a new spring seminar series on "Climate Change & the Media," sponsored by the Belfer Center's Environment and Natural Resources Program and the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.

Climate change coverage has greatly increased in the international mainstream press and in the opinion-driven blogosphere in recent years, including the recent focus on "Climategate" science emails, the US congressional debate and the United Nations Copenhagen conference. Surveys show that the American public is among the most divided in terms of agreement with scientific findings that climate change is a serious manmade threat that requires urgent action in the United States and abroad. The public divide appears to be increasing in this country, the United Kingdom and elsewhere.This seminar will focus on the role of the media in communicating about climate change science, policy and politics to the general public and the influence on public opinion. The seminar will look at ways to improve the public dialogue over climate change.

Andrew C. Revkin: The New York Times "Dot Earth" blogger and journalist, Senior Fellow, Pace University Academy for Applied Environmental Studies

Matthew Nisbet: Assistant Professor, American University School of Communication, "Framing Science" blogger, climate change public opinion expert

Thomas Patterson (discussant): Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press, Shorenstein Center, HKS

All are welcome and invited to attend. Lunch will be served. Admittance will be on a first-come, first serve basis.

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