Fall speaking lineup takes me to Boston, Palo Alto, Seattle, Minneapolis and many places in between




It's going to be a busy fall semester. Classes start here at American University next week but in my down time I will be traveling to many different cities and major institutions to talk to a diversity of groups about new directions in science communication. Below is a lineup as it stands right now.


A few other possible stops are still in the works. These trips will be an opportunity to talk about how research can and should inform public engagement efforts, but it will also be a great opportunity to gain insights from some of the smartest people in the country.





11.27.07. National Academies of Science*, DC.

10.24.07. Center for Inquiry-NYC*.

10.19.07 Nicholas Institute for the Environment, Duke University

10.18.07. Biology Directorate, National Science Foundation, DC.

10.05.07. Forum on Science, Ethics, and Policy, University of Washington, Seattle*.

10.05.07. Dept. of Communication, University of Washington, Seattle.

10.01.07. George Washington University, DC*.

9.28.07. Bell Museum of Natural History, MN*.

9.28.07. Assoc. Reproductive Health Professionals, MN*.

9.12.07. Consortium on Technology and Society, Northeastern University, Boston, MA.

9.07.07. Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, Stanford University, CA.

*Part of the Speaking Science 2.0 tour.

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