AU Forum to Focus on "The Climate Change Generation: Youth, Media, and Politics In an Unsustainable World"


The Katzen Arts Center on the American University campus will be host to a discussion of the civic and personal challenges that college students face on climate change.

Here's a head up on a very timely panel and forum to be held here at American University on February 9th and to be broadcast live on NPR affiliate WAMU. If you can't attend, the broadcast will be archived at the WAMU site. More details will be forthcoming, including a social media site where forum attendees and listeners can weigh in with their comments and feedback.

The Climate Change Generation: Youth, Media and Politics in an Unsustainable World

Sponsored by the School of Communication at American University

Tues. February 9th, 7-8pm
Katzen Arts Center
American University
4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC

*Arrive by 630 to make sure you have a seat.

Policy action on climate change remains politically gridlocked in the United States and throughout the world, while polls show that Americans remain divided about the causes of climate change and the urgency of the problem. For Americans under the age of 30, climate change may prove to be their generation's greatest societal challenge. How are young people responding to climate change, and what role do the media and universities play in preparing the next generation of citizens to actively participate on the issue?

Featuring:
Matthew Nisbet, Assistant Professor of Public Communication, American University School of Communication
Juliet Eilperin, environmental reporter, The Washington Post
Kate Sheppard, energy and environmental politics reporter, Mother Jones

Moderated by Jane Hall, Associate Professor of Journalism, American University School of Communication

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