ABC and The Australian on "Science Communication Re-Considered"

Our recent article at Nature Biotechnology (PDF, news release) has generated attention Down Under, with coverage appearing at the Australian Broadcasting Service and The Australian newspaper.

Both outlets do a good job of reporting on the central themes of the article, especially The Australian, which leads with a focus on the "miserly" nature of audiences, a reality that always seems to captivate journalists. Of course, there are also the traditional reservations voiced.

In a forthcoming article at the American Journal of Botany, my colleague Dietram Scheufele and I address these common concerns at considerable length, expanding at over 8,000 words on our arguments originally published at The Scientist magazine in 2007. The new article should appear this fall, as part of a special issue marking the Year of Science 2009. For a preview, see video of a recent lecture I gave at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

I also address these concerns in a book chapter in an edited volume appearing in September on "The Ethics of Framing Science." Go here for an excerpt.

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