Lumina Prize awarded for innovation in post-high school education

Congratulations to our Audience's Choice and Judges' Choice Award Winners!


Winners announced for Lumina Prize

In January, Big Think and Lumina Foundation called for innovative ideas in post-high school training and education with an emphasis on an entrepreneurial approach. Today, we are pleased to announce that we have selected two winners.

The Judges' Choice Award

The Judge's Choice Award goes to PeerForward, an organization dedicated to increasing the education and career success rates of students in low-income schools and communities by mobilizing the power of positive peer influence. You can watch their winning video entry here.

For the next and final leg of the competition, winners will be flown (or train-ed) to Big Think's studio in New York City where they will receive coaching from top social venture and media experts on how to deliver a spectacular and direct business pitch.

The Audience Choice Award

The Audience Choice Award goes to Greater Commons. Founded by Todd McLeod and Andrew Cull, Greater Commons is an organization that helps people live happier, more successful and fulfilling lives through agile learning. You can watch their winning video entry here.

Congratulations PeerForward and Greater Commons!

And thank you to our four finalists, our community of voters, and the wonderful judges who helped us make this competition possible. All applicants had fantastic ideas and entrepreneurial spirit.

For the next and final leg of the competition, winners will be flown (or train-ed) to Big Think's studio in New York City where they will receive coaching from top social venture and media experts on how to deliver a spectacular and direct business pitch.

Big Think producers will film and edit the footage from the pitch training and create a digital copy to be released on our website and additionally used by the winners as a tool to meet potential investors and stakeholders. We look forward to working with Greater Commons and PeerForward and are excited to release their pitches on Big Think in the coming months!

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