Imagine No Countries: The Singularity and Politics

We live in one unified world.

Imagine No Countries: The Singularity and Politics

We already have a one-world culture. Information flows around the world. We reach a consensus on different issues through this very rapid, decentralized information flow.  So already governments are less important. 


There’s trillions of dollars of commerce on the Web, which has no concept of national boundaries.  The economy is a one-world economy. Look at the recession we had. Every industry in every country was affected within a week in October, 2008.  So it is one unified world. I think you will see that reflected in agreements and in new institutions, but the reality is there ahead of any institutional changes.

60 Second Reads is recorded in Big Think's studio.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

She met mere mortals with and without the Vatican's approval.

Historically, Europe is the continent where most apparitions of the Virgin Mary have been reported.

Strange Maps
  • For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.
  • These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.
  • Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too.
Keep reading Show less

How space debris created the world’s largest garbage dump

Since 1957, the world's space agencies have been polluting the space above us with countless pieces of junk, threatening our technological infrastructure and ability to venture deeper into space.

Space debris orbiting Earth

Framestock via Adobe Stock
Technology & Innovation
  • Space debris is any human-made object that's currently orbiting Earth.
  • When space debris collides with other space debris, it can create thousands more pieces of junk, a dangerous phenomenon known as the Kessler syndrome.
  • Radical solutions are being proposed to fix the problem, some of which just might work. (See the video embedded toward the end of the article.)
Keep reading Show less

Looking for something? A team at MIT develop a robot that sees through walls

It uses radio waves to pinpoint items, even when they're hidden from view.

TORU YAMANAKA/AFP via Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
In recent years, robots have gained artificial vision, touch, and even smell.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast