Cognitive Reappraisal: What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Stronger

You can grow from failure and then you work at it again.  You never give up.  You keep pushing forward.

Part of the resilience prescription is what we call cognitive reappraisal, and that involves looking at the trauma that you have unfortunately experienced and reframing it.  You assimilate it into your life view and you move on.  In a sense it does become part of you, but by assimilating it into your life view you can even grow from it.  We call that post traumatic growth.  What doesn't kill you makes you stronger, that is apparently a song now that is quite popular even though that was a quote from Nietzsche.

By reframing the trauma and assimilating it into your life view you can move on and not be stuck in the trauma, but along the way you will experience failure.  There will be disappointments.  You'll still have some reminders and symptoms of the trauma, but that's OK because you can grow from failure.  In fact, you really can't grow as a person and reach your full potential unless you fail.


Then you know you've been kind of pushing the envelope.  Failure is good.  You can grow from failure and then you work at it again.  You never give up.  You keep pushing forward.

60 Second Reads is recorded in Big Think's studio.

Image courtesy fo Shutterstock. 

Related Articles

A controversial theory claims past, present, and future exist at the same time

Our experience of time may be blinding us to its true nature, say scientists.

Back to the Future.
Surprising Science
  • Time may not be passing at all, says the Block Universe Theory.
  • Time travel may be possible.
  • Your perception of time is likely relative to you and limited.
Keep reading Show less

Six disastrous encounters with the world’s most hostile uncontacted tribe

From questionable shipwrecks to outright attacks, they clearly don't want to be bothered.

Culture & Religion
  • Many have tried to contact the Sentinelese, to write about them, or otherwise.
  • But the inhabitants of the 23 square mile island in the Bay of Bengal don't want anything to do with the outside world.
  • Their numbers are unknown, but either 40 or 500 remain.
Keep reading Show less