6-word motto contest: And the winner is...

I thoroughly enjoyed reading the submissions for my\nrecent contest. As you may recall, I asked readers, "What would be a good\nsix-word motto for your nation's schools?"


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Here are my favorites. All of these were picked solely by me and all had to\ndo with the USA. Your list might be different!

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6. This one gets at the lack of leadership during an era of turbulence. Of\ncourse that's one of the main themes of my work and this blog.

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USA: Rudderless in the sea of change (Dave)

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5. Although it's a phrase that's been used by others, I thought this was a\nnice choice for this contest. It captures much of the essential tension between\nthe current system and the constructivist leanings of many edubloggers.

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USA: Dewey ... or don't we?
(Scott,\nI know you're jonesing for a CASTLE mug. Maybe next time!)

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4. This one just made me laugh ('cause, given its essential truth, otherwise\nI'd have to cry)! All three of this contributor's entries were pretty\nclever...

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USA: Standardization + medication = American education (Ahniwa)

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3. David Warlick and others\nhave aptly noted that personal computers are the pencil and paper of our\ntime. That's why this one strikes home so deftly.

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USA: Number two pencil is main tool (Michelle)

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2. The 'faddism' that occurs in American education is legendary. Veteran\nteachers roll their eyes at the latest thing that comes along, saying "This too\nshall pass."

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USA: Another solution to a previous solution (drollord)

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1. With advance apologies to Larry\nand Alice,\nwho rightfully noted a concern that most of the entries were negative, my\nfavorite was this one. Our schools have, indeed, been extremely positive\ncontributors to American society and I am a big proponent of schools and\neducators. That said, like others, I still think that there is a LOT of wasted\npotential and that often students succeed despite, not because of, their K-12\neducational experiences. See, for example, the classroom observation studies\nprofiled in John Goodlad's A\nPlace Called School (whole book), Mike Schmoker's Results\nNow (p. 18), or in the March 30, 2007 article\nby Robert Pianta in Science.\nSo with due respect to all of the educators who are working extremely hard, my\npersonal selection for best 6–word motto is...

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USA: Underwhelming kids on a daily basis (Diana)
(note:\nthis could apply to American public policy too, not just\nschools)

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Diana, I don't know who you are, but if you contact me, I'll mail you a CASTLE mug. Paul,\nplease contact me also. I'm\ngoing to award you a bonus mug because I like how\nyou involved your middle schoolers. Thanks, everyone, for\nparticipating!

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