Two Galaxies Collide, Creating Space Penguin

The European Space Agency and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope produced this image of two galaxies known as Arp 142 that strongly resembles a penguin guarding an egg.

The European Space Agency and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope produced this image of two galaxies known as Arp 142 that strongly resembles a penguin guarding an egg. What is actually happening is extremely violent, as the two galaxies tear each other apart. The galaxies are 326 million light years from Earth in the constellation Hydra. 


See a large version of this image here

Photograph: Hubble Space Telescope Heritage Team/Nasa, Esa

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