Donut Shaped Rock on Mars Promps Lawsuit

The astrobiologist Dr. Rhawn Joseph has filed a lawsuit to compel NASA and its administrator, Charles Bolden, to take a closer look at the rock. 

Donut Shaped Rock on Mars Promps Lawsuit

The Opportunity rover currently exploring Mars picked up a donut-shaped rock that had not appeared in other images taken as recently as twelve Martian days (sols) before. 


The astrobiologist Dr. Rhawn Joseph has filed a lawsuit to compel NASA and its administrator, Charles Bolden, to take a closer look at the rock. 

Image Credit: Mars Exploration Rover MissionCornellJPLNASA

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Credit: Pieter Bruegel the Elder. (Museo del Prado).
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Credit: NASA / JPL - Caltech.
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