This afternoon's installment on Sada al-Malahim will be a bit shorter than earlier versions, as there is much in the article that I will be publishing later in a different format and Waq al-waq likes to test the patience of our readers. What can I say: we're inscrutable that way.

This article focuses on the women of Yemen and their role in supporting al-Qaeda and is entitled: "Women of Yemen: and the Crusader War". This is, I think, one of the most overlooked aspects of studying al-Qaeda like networks. I am reminded of an interview I once read with Nasir al-Bahri, Usama bin Ladin's former bodyguard and the brother-in-law of Salim Hamdan (he of Hamdan v. Rumsfeld fame), and how he got his start on jihad thanks to a woman in Saudi Arabia.

The article gives some interesting - and never before known - information about the immediate aftermath of the February 2006 prison break, which of the prisoners were traveling together and where they went. For me, this was one of the most interesting parts.

The article profiles a number of different women and groups of women, including the women of the 'Abidah tribe as well as the women of Al Shabwan. Frequently the example of the women is used to shame the men.