I have some unexpected free time this morning, so I thought it would be nice to return to the short-lived morning papers segment of Waq al-waq.

US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates spent the day in Saudi and seems convinced that it would make a good destination for at least some of the Yemenis currently in Guantanamo. I continue to argue that this is a bad idea, and will cause more problems in the long term then it solves in the short term, but my increasingly shrill cries seem to be falling on deaf ears.

I've never understood quotes like this (which feature anonymous officials in one country referring to anonymous officials in another country):

"A second senior Obama administration official said the Yemeni government appears more agreeable now to send its citizens to Saudi Arabia."

But this sharply contrasts with my knowledge of the Yemeni side of these negotiations/lectures.

And finally, while I can't speak for Brian (despite multiple attempts to gain that privilege) I must be one of the few that is not enamored of Saudi's program. (See here for more thoughts)

"Few dispute that Saudi Arabia has one of the most successful jihadist rehabilitation programs in the world."

Moving along, to no one's surprise as the situation in the south gets worse (although yesterday was relatively calm) other security concerns also grow. 'Abd al-Malik al-Huthi's forces continue to clash with government soldiers in the north. The three days of fighting have left at least three al-Huthi supporters dead and inspired a statement from 'Abd al-Malik al-Huthi's office entitled "Daily Violations," which again accuses Salih of being linked to the US and Israel. Not good in light of the report on the situation that will soon be released.

Finally, Khaled al-Hammadi has coverage of President's Salih's speech to a GPC conference, calling on the opposition to join the government. But warning them that they can't be both part of the government and part of the opposition, in other words if they come into the tent they need to shut-up and act happy. He also has some strong words for the Southern Movement, calling it not so much a movement as a group intent on carrying out "acts of sabotage."