Writing for the New Yorker

Jeffrey Toobin, a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1993 and the senior legal analyst for CNN, is one of the most recognized and admired legal journalists in the country.

His most recent book, The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court, was published in the fall of 2007. The book spent more than four months on the New York Times best-seller list and was named one of the ten best books of the year by the New York Times Book Review, Time, Newsweek, Fortune, Entertainment Weekly, and the Economist. The Nine also received the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize for Non-fiction and the Silver Gavel Award of the American Bar Association.

Toobin joined CNN in 2002 after six years with ABC News. In 2000, he received an Emmy Award for his coverage of the Elian Gonzalez case.  Before joining The New Yorker, Toobin served as an Assistant United States Attorney in Brooklyn, New York. He also served as an associate counsel in the Office of Independent Counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, an experience that provided the basis for his first book, Opening Arguments: A Young Lawyer’s First Case: United States v. Oliver North.

Jeffrey Toobin received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1982, and, in 1986, graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review. He lives in Manhattan.

  • Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

Question: How do you approach long-form nonfiction?

 

Jeffrey Toobin: Well, I guess, I start with what’s written on the subject. I just sort of do research. Have there been newspaper articles, have there been other magazine articles. Now, one of the tricks with New Yorker stories is you want to pick a story that is familiar enough that people will want to read about it, but not so familiar that they feel like they already know everything and they don’t want to read a whole, long New Yorker stories. So usually when I pick a subject, there’s some stuff written about it but not a ton.

And then, when I feel like I sort of know what the issues are, I kind of work around the edges of the story first. I’ll often talk to, say, with me it’s often the law professor who’s familiar with the story, who can sort of outline what’s at stake, you know, what’s interesting, what’s the hot controversy about it. And then, maybe I’ll start to talk to a more peripheral players in the story. And only at the end or at least the end of the beginning, will I try to interview the protagonist.

Because, I think, in order to ask good questions, you have to know a lot about the subject to start with. So I am a great believer in not going to the main characters first ‘cause I need to educate myself about it so I can ask the right questions. And then, it’s often just a matter of finding scenes. I often think of New Yorker stories in terms of set pieces, in terms of, you know, watching something happen as a reader and thus as a writer. So how can I go and see if I’m writing a profile, see the person, you know, interact, give orders, give a speech, perform, be backstage, just sort of, how can I dramatize the story. One thing that I always worry about, I mean, is that… I am in the business usually of writing stories that have issues at their core.

Is Alberto Gonzalez doing his job as attorney general. You know, what are going to do about Guantanamo. The challenge is to take those issues and turn them into stories people want to read. I always want a story to be a narrative. Here’s how it started and their complications ensued and here’s how it ended. That, you know, it takes you along with you. That it can’t just be about an abstraction and that’s a tug I often feel. So in my reporting, I’m always thinking about how do I make this into a story and how do I, in the famous journalistic instruction, how do I show, don’t tell. How do I show things happening rather than just sort of explain it.

 

Recorded on: September 5, 2008


×