Edie-weiner-hs
Edie Weiner
Futurist
04:19

Wise Women Rise to the Top

Wise Women Rise to the Top

There’s a big difference between being smart and being wise, and also being intelligent, frankly, says futurist Edie Weiner.

Edie Weiner

Edie Weiner is president of Weiner, Edrich, Brown, Inc., a leading futurist consulting group. Formed in 1977, WEB has served over 400 clients (corporate, academic, government) in identifying opportunities in the areas of marketing, product development, strategic planning, investments, human resources and public affairs. Clients have ranged from the U.S. Congress to many of the Fortune 500.  She is acknowledged as one of the most influential practitioners of social, technological, political and economic intelligence-gathering.

At 29, Ms. Weiner was the youngest outside woman ever elected to a corporate board.  She has been a guest lecturer at Wharton, Harvard, The U.S. Army War College, and a number of other universities. Her articles have appeared in numerous publications, including The Harvard Business Review, The Futurist, and The Wall Street Journal. She has co-authored four books with her partner Arnold Brown: Supermanaging (McGraw-Hill 1984), Office Biology (MasterMedia 1993), Insider’s Guide to the Future (Bottom Line, 1997), and FutureThink (Prentice Hall, 2006). She has keynoted over 300 conferences.

Throughout the 1990s, she founded and chaired the Esteem Teams, an innovative program in which dozens of inner city, at risk girls were mentored by executive women.

She serves on numerous Boards and Advisory Boards, including the US Comptroller General’s Advisory Board, Women’s Leadership Exchange, and The SyFy Channel.  In the past, she has been on the Board or Advisory Board of the José Limón Dance Foundation (Chair), UNUM Corporation, First Unum Corp., CompUSA, the Fashion Group International, ThinkQuest New York City (Chair), Boardroom Inc., Independent Agents & Brokers of New York, and the Women’s Forum.  Ms. Weiner is a member of the Women’s Forum, a co-founder of the Belizean Grove, the first recipient of the Fashion Group International’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award (1998), NOW New York’s 2011 Woman of Power and Influence Award, and The World Future Society’s 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

Transcript

Edie Weiner: I actually think that the women who are the most successful in rising to executive ranks and then ultimately being able to populate boards are women who know how to be wise.  And there’s a big difference between being smart and being wise, and also being intelligent, frankly.  

Smart is the ability to learn a lot of things and then repeat them back at some future time as if everything was around a model or a formula.  Nobody’s going to pay for smart in the future because the smarter the doctor, the smarter the lawyer, the smarter the engineer, the smarter the financier, that’s all going onto software.  

So we move up the ladder and we say that what we really value and what will rise to the top is intelligence.  And what is that?  That’s the ability to figure things out that you’ve never learned before.  So how do you get from A to D when there is no B and nobody can agree on C?  That’s intelligence, and that’s valued a lot.  And so intelligence, male or female, is something that is valued in a lot of discussions.  

But in the end, how you get to the very top frequently rests on wisdom.  And wisdom is not a function of being smart or intelligent.  Sometimes it’s not linked to the two.  There are very intelligent people who are not wise at all, and there are a lot of wise people who are just not intelligent enough to sit at that board table.  

So you need to have intelligence, but you need to have wisdom, and wisdom is situational.  Wisdom is knowing what to say to whom, when, and under what circumstances, and for what purpose.  And I will tell you that the hardest thing that comes to women--and I suffered from this so much in my career--is that we’re constantly strategically thinking about everything, and all the stakeholders, and what this is going to mean, and how to get this better for the long term.  So the intelligence is not in question.  What’s in question is how do we reign ourselves in from asking all of this, or demanding all of this, or wanting all of this.  And so we’re constantly asking, is this the hill I want to die on?  Is this the stand I want to take? . . . because five minutes from now there may be another stand I want to take, and a half hour from now there may be another stand on another issue I want to take.  

And it’s very weary to constantly ask yourself, is this the hill I want to die on?  And you have to ask yourself that question.  Otherwise you just become the person who keeps raising the issue again and again.  “Oh well, okay, here comes Edie again, she’s now concerned about children in the Third World. . . . Okay, here comes Edie again, she’s now concerned about whether we’re polluting that strip of land. . . . Okay, well here comes Edie again, she’s worried that we’re basically, you know, throwing people out of work as we do this. . . . Okay, here’s Edie again. . . . “ And then your power is erased because when you interject that too much, you lose your whole power.  So wisdom is really knowing exactly what hills you’re going to die on and how to hold that in.  And I have to tell you, it takes a toll.  

I really do respect the women who run for public office because it is so personally assaulting on them.  How they don’t go home every night and want to shoot themselves because there’s so much negative feedback; they have to be so hardened.  And I really respect women who rise to the top of corporate ranks because they have to deal with so much that is negative to get there, they have to be hardened.  And the same thing is true in the board room.  

Being wise comes with hardening, judgment, experience, and ultimately, ultimately, the independence of finally stepping out into the sunlight and saying, “I know I can’t do it all.  I will do some, and if that some gets me in trouble, so be it.  I can walk away.” 

Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler & Elizabeth Rodd

 

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