Marion Nestle
Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, NYU
01:11

Why do we overeat?

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People are more likely to eat more the more food is in front of them.

Marion Nestle

Marion Nestle is a consumer activist, nutritionist, and academic who specializes in the politics of food and dietary choice. Nestle received her BA, PhD, and MPH from the University of California, Berkeley. In 1988, Nestle was appointed Chair of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health. She held that position until 2004, when she became the Paulette Goddard Professor in the same department.

Nestle is the author of numerous books, including "Food Politics," which explored the way corporations influence our nutritional choices, and "What to Eat," an survey of how to navigate the modern American supermarket. Aside from her books and teaching, Nestle writes a popular blog for the Atlantic Food Channel. 

 

Transcript

Marion Nestle: Actually there’s very good research now that shows why people overeat.  It turns out that anybody, no matter how educated you are about it – even me – I will overeat if I’m presented with a large amount of food.  In fact you can demonstrate that the larger portion of the food presented to somebody, the more calories they will eat from that food even if they don’t finish it.  Food that is closer to you will be consumed in larger amounts than food that’s further away.  Food in wide, fat glasses will be consumed in greater number of calories than in tall, thin glasses.  I mean there are all kinds of sort of visual and little tricks that companies use to get people to eat more food.  They knew all of this.  We’ve only learned about it recently through the work of people doing terrific research.


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