Jeanne Shaheen
fmr. Governor, New Hampshire (D)
07:22

Where are we?

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Jeanne Shaheen talks about the continued problem of global poverty, arguing that it's hard to get someone to care about nuclear proliferation if they don't know where their next meal is coming from.

Jeanne Shaheen

The first woman in history to be elected a Governor and a United States Senator, Jeanne Shaheen has been involved in all levels of New Hampshire life. She taught in a New Hampshire high school, chaired the Town of Madbury's zoning board and served three terms in the State Senate. Shaheen became the first woman elected Governor of New Hampshire, serving three terms from 1997-2003. In 2008 Shaheen became the first woman elected to the United States Senate from New Hampshire.

A champion of middle class families, as Governor, Shaheen worked to make college more affordable, made public kindergarten a reality for over 25,000 additional children, and extended affordable health coverage to tens of thousands of New Hampshire children. Her focus on the economy led to the creation of nearly 67,000 new jobs during her six years as Governor and the third-highest high tech employment in the nation.  Shaheen also signed historic civil rights laws, including legislation making New Hampshire only the 10th state to add sexual orientation to its anti-discrimination laws.

In 2005 she took on the challenge of forging a new generation of public leaders when she became the Director of Harvard University's Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government, but resigned to run for the United States Senate in the 2008 elections, which she ended up winning.

Transcript

Question: When you read the newspaper or watch the news, what issues stand out for you?

Jeanne Shaheen: Well certainly global warming is one of those things. If we hope to have a world where we can still inhabit it in the same way in the next century, then we need to begin to address that issue; not just today, but probably 20 years ago. Poverty is one of the other huge factors in what happens to people, and nuclear weapons, I think we need to hopefully disarm our nuclear weapons. And I hope … There was a time when I thought I would actually see that happening my lifetime. I’m becoming more discouraged about that today.

Recorded on: 6/13/07


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