What Keeps Malachy McCourt Up At Night?

Malachy McCourt was born in Brooklyn, USA and from the age of three was raised in Limerick, Ireland. He returned to the land of his birth at the age of twenty and again worked at the manual tasks such as longshoreman, truck loader, dishwasher, until he became an actor. That career took him to Broadway and Off-Broadway and regional theatres in plays such as Mass Appeal, Da, The Hostage, Inherit the Wind, Carousel and Translations. The soap operas such as Ryan's Hope, Search for Tomorrow, One Life to Live, and All My Children were also a good source of work and sustenance as were the movies Molly Maguires, She's the One, The Devil's Own, Green Card, and TV movies such as You Can't Go Home Again and The Dain Curse. Due to a heavy schedule of writing, book signings and public appearances McCourt had to take a sabbatical from the acting trade but is now back after completing five movies Happy Hour, Guru of Sex, Gods and Generals, and Ash Wednesday plus a running part in the HBO prison series Oz. As well as being the co-author of the play A Couple of Blaguards with his brother Frank, Malachy has written his own New York Times bestseller memoir, A Monk Swimming, published by Hyperion Press. His memoir, Singing My Him Song, now out in paperback is published by Harper Collins. Running Press recently published four of Malachy’s books: the history of the song Danny Boy, a history of The Claddagh Ring, Voices of Ireland, an anthology, and Malachy McCourt’s History of Ireland. Recent books, Harold Be Thy Name and Bush Lies in State, are published by Welcome Rain. In the works is I Never Drink When I’m Sober for Harper Collins. Malachy writes a column, Sez I to Myself, that appears in the Manhattan Spirit, The Westsider and Our Town in NYC. 

 

 

  • Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

Question: What keeps you up at night? 

Malachy McCourt: What keeps me up?  John Stewart.  On the Daily Show. I thoroughly enjoy that show.  But the other is, I wonder what I can do about war.  Is it the destiny of human kind to eventually wipe ourselves out with these weapons of mass destruction?  Are we stupid to think that we can control them?  And if they said, we only have 2,500 atomic weapons, or neutron bombs?  What difference does this make, if they have one or 2,500?  The damage will be just the same, there’s overkill there.  And I would like to do away with all kind of – all weapons.  A dream – totally.  Including the bow an arrow. 

Recorded on March 10, 2010


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