What is your counsel?

Anthony Fauci is the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He is an immunologist who has made substantial contributions to research on AIDS and other immunodeficiencies. He has pioneered the field of human immunoregulation and developed effective therapies for formally fatal inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases. In the field of AIDS research, he has helped contribute to an understanding of how the AIDS virus destroys the body's defenses leading to its susceptibility to deadly infections.

He has also served as an editor of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine and has authored, coauthored or edited more than 1,100 scientific publications, including several textbooks. Dr. Fauci is a key advisor to the White House and Department of Health and Human Services on global AIDS issues and public health protections against emerging infectious disease threats, such as pandemic influenza. He was educated at Cornell University Medical College and holds 32 honorary doctorate degrees. 

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TRANSCRIPT

Question: What is your counsel?

Anthony Fauci: Well I think collectively, we should be paying more attention to what is going on around us in the world among people who don’t have the advantages that we have. I think that it is our responsibility as a society to pay attention to, to be aware of, and to the best of our capability, help those people who are in dire straits, or relatively dire straits – be it in health, in poverty, or what have you – so that we can at least say that we didn’t look the other way when there were people who are global citizens and our neighbors, as it were – because we’re all joined together – and that we let that happen without trying to do something about it.

So it’s attention to the problems of the world, particularly those people who are suffering and disenfranchised.

Well simple steps is to elect good leadership that appreciates that goal. And that’s why it’s very important when you have things like presidential debates to hear specifically – not necessarily in a one-minute sound bite – but specifically what candidates feel about our responsibility in issues like global health and the health of our country [USA].

So I think ordinary citizens can do something really very important, very simply. And that is understand what people are saying, what their philosophy is, and go vote for the person that fulfills what you feel is the best way to go for our country.

 

Recorded On: July 6, 2007


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