What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

Watch videos

World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

Go to blogs

Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

Find out more
Close
With rendition switcher

Transcript

Question: Where do you get your inspiration?

Moby: What inspires me? Hmmmm, I guess going back to what I said earlier, the main thing that inspires me is to presumptuously want to improve the circumstances in which I find myself. Life of course is miraculous and amazing, but it can be really mundane, and one of the things that drives me in music or art or what have you is the desire to sort of make life less mundane. And maybe it is a personal failing of my own that I can never, I mean, because life is not mundane, but, to me, sometimes, it can be kind of routine and kind of mundane, so I sort of feel this almost compulsion to challenge that.

Question: Is creativity born or learned?

Moby: I work under the assumption that everybody is innately creative, but maybe creativity is like a plant or it is a seed, and unless it is watered and taken care of and tended and put in a nice environment, it is never going to grow, it is never going to blossom. And it drives me crazy that people don’t give themselves the license to be creative and express themselves creatively. So many people in our culture think of creativity as something that someone else does.

Like so many musicians, like people who really would love to sit down and play piano, they are afraid to do so because they are intimidated by the people who are really good at it; and the people who are really good at it were not born really good at it. No one is born a great pianist, no one is born a great painter, no one is born a great photographer. Its like you just take that spark and you keep working on it.

Question: What does living green mean to you?

Moby: Living green to me is something that more often than not, I mean, more often then not people do because it makes them feel better about themselves, which is great, and there is nothing wrong with that. I mean, clearly, environmental degradation is the result of cumulative effort, like if China had one coal fired power plant it wouldn’t be that bad.

The fact that they open one coal fired power plant every week, the cumulative effect of that is really deleterious for the global environment, the same way if a friend of mine replaces her incandescent light bulb with compact florescent light bulbs, the effect on the environment is negligible at best, but if everybody in the United States does that, there will actually be good consequences. So living green, it means different things to different people, but ultimately I guess it is that simple choice, like a choice between doing something that is good for you and good for the environment or doing something that is bad for you and bad for the environment so it just seems like it makes sense to do the thing that is good for you and good for the environment.

 June 16, 2008

 

What inspires you?

Newsletter: Share: