What do you believe?

Prozac to cure a personal philosophy.
  • Transcript


Question: Do you have a personal philosophy?

Josh Lieb: You know I had one, and then I started taking Prozac. And now I’m just bulling forward. I’m just getting through day-by-day. I don’t know. You know that’s a joke, but I really am just bulling forward. It is such an impossibly complicated and depressing world, that unless you just sort of keep your eye on the small things – keeping your wife happy; you know, doing a good job at work; going home and feeding the dogs – you will go crazy. You know I guess looking back at some of the things I said. Like I don’t think I’m making the world a better place, and I don’t think I’m contributing to anything. So that’s really depressing. That’s a very sad philosophy. Okay, so maybe I’m making the world a little better place. You know I’m making my wife happy, and I really like her, so that’s nice. You know I’ve done something there. And my dogs rely on me. And so I don’t know.

I guess my philosophy is the most important things you can do are for your family and for your friends. I think everything else is kind of meaningless. And if you devote yourself to a cause above your friends and family, you’re just kidding yourself. I think everything, every government, every world is fleeting. It’s not going to last forever. The only really permanent things in your life are your family and friends. You know the lowest circle in hell was for Brutus because he betrayed his friend. And he did it for his country, but you know screw your country. Because Rome is gone now, but Cesar has always betrayed. So I think you can really only, in a way, care and do good. And hopefully your friends are good people, and your family is good people. But you can really just try to make the world a better place for them and that’s it.

Recorded on December 11, 2007