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Question: What motivated your decision to give most of your fortune to charity? 

Azim Premji: I think it is basically fundamental in terms of when much is given, much is expected to be given back in return. And there is so much people can consume in terms of wealth and require in terms of wealth. If one has been blessed or have been fortunate enough to have got much more than normal wealth, it is but natural that one expects a certain fiduciary responsibility in terms of how that wealth is applied, used and leveraged for purposes of society. 

Question: Why is philanthropy not as developed in India as it is in North America? 

Azim Premji: The concept of the strong linkage to the family is breaking down in Western nations. So the obligations which I think to an extent, not only Indian, but many people feel toward their families is much less in terms of Western people and particularly American people. So, when you take a philosophy approach that you do not have to leave wealth to your families, you are going to have to tell yourself, "Do you take it to the grave, or do you donate it for some more worthwhile purpose?" And this also reflects in the way that families get structured. You know, children live separately; children put old parents into homes instead of putting them into their homes. What the children expect from the parents, what the parents expect from their children. 

Question: What is your philosophy when it comes to philanthropy? 

Azim Premji: We’ve been focusing on primary education in India for the past nine years, both in Wipro, Ltd., as well as in the foundation that I set up. You have to make a bet to where you think you can really make a contribution, where you could really build an depth of understanding. So it was really very clear from day one that we had to have focus. Two, it had to be a cause which was relevant to the country in terms of need. A critical cause in terms of need where you saw a gap between what could be and what it was. And three, it should be an area where it should have an access beyond just a specific educating of a child. We concluded that if we could educate children better in our country, you would have better citizens. But importantly, we also realized that if you educate the girl child, when she grows up and starts a family, she has a smaller family, which is a huge requirement in terms of the growth of our population, which is more manageable. And three, again, if you educate the girl child, when she grows up and she starts a family, or looks after a household, she has much higher consciousness on primary health care. 

Question: What are the best methods for improving education in India? 

Azim Premji: I think, you know, what you must understand is the state of education in India. You have one side, the cities, which have very good schools, average schools, and not so good schools. The level of education in these cities is fairly good. They get fairly good teachers. On the other side, you have the villages of India, where 65% to 70% of the people of India live. And there we have education, which is in the villages, and 90% of that education is run by the state governments, partly funded by the central government. Where the state government does not charge any fees, gives free uniforms, gives a free mid-day meal, which is very often the best meal the child gets, and where there are six million unionized teachers in the states' governments, multiple state governments that we have across the country. Standards of education there are very, very low. The commitment of the teachers is very, very low. The quality of the teacher, the training of the teacher, is very, very low. So, there is an enormous amount one can do to upgrade the quality of teaching, the quality of the teachers, the way the curricula is actually learned, the way it is facilitated to learn, the way you can community intervene to get community pressures building up on the education system to demand certain standards. The way you can train the teacher-training institute. 

There are 600 districts in India. Every district in India has a teacher-training institute. And every teacher in the state government school requires spending 15 days of retraining in these institutes. Most of these institutes are in shambles and many of them have teachers who are worse than the teacher they are supposed to teach. So, there’s an enormous amount of leverage one can do in terms of upgrading this entire infrastructure. 

Always the government spends a lot of money, there’s an enormous amount one can do in training and upgrading the quality of the state function. That’s precisely what we do in our foundation. And we have been successful now because we have been working for nine years in this. We're involved now with over 2.5 million children. 

Recorded on May 7, 2010
Interviewed by Victoria Brown
 

The Indian Bill Gates

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