What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

Watch videos

World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

Go to blogs

Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

Find out more
Close
With rendition switcher

Transcript

Lyall: Well, in the old days, it that really was true. They all used to beat each other senseless and, you know, have sex with each other ‘cause there are no girls around. I mean, they lived in these completely women-free environments from the time they were 9 to the time they got out of college. And they’d get out of college and it would just be these strange creatures, women. They couldn’t deal with it. And their country was really run by men, ‘cause they were all [doing it with] each other, yet there was a real homophobic streak in the society, so they had to do it and pretend they weren’t doing it. And the beating, you know, really went on until the end of the ‘90s. It was then finally made illegal. But men, you know, these men were all on this weird situation where they, it was a kind of sexual thrill, I think. And that’s why they all loved Margaret Thatcher, ‘cause she was this kind of, you know, figure of authority and maybe a figure of pain, a little bit. And I, you know, the writer Christopher Hitchens told me this hilarious story about how he, years and years ago, when she was not Prime Minister but was the Head of the Conservative Party, he wrote a piece where he said he sort of fancied her, you know. She was kind of sexy, he thought. And he met her once, and he sort of, he said, I felt maybe there’s this little frisson going on, and we just started talking about foreign policy, and it was kind of sexy, and they disagreed about something. And she said, “No you’re wrong.” And he said, ”No I’m right.” And she said, “No you’re wrong,” [and that] little thing, and then he said “Bend over.” And she hit him on his butt with her papers from the Parliament, you know, like her little things, the order of the day papers. And then she did that and she said, “Naughty boy. Don’t do that again.” And, you know, that’s the kind of thing they all… they have this, like, little, titillating naughty boy thing about themselves. And, you know, there was that guy recently, he was head of Formula One Racing who got caught going to prostitutes and apparently wanting to them to dress up like naughty camp operators and then also inmates in a concentration camp. And there’s a lot of kind of weird spanking and speaking in German and ordering each other around. And his defense, he sued for invasion of privacy, and he actually won. But his defense was, “Look, okay. I did it. So what?” you know, “This is what people do if I want to get my kicks,” you know, “spanking people dressed in German,” you know, “costume. Good for me.” And actually he won his case, which was really interesting. And he didn’t… The thing is, he didn’t go to, like, sexual rehab clinic or, say, you know, “God, I have a real problem. I’m going to stop doing this.” He said “This is what I like to do, you know? Sue me.”

 

Sarah Lyall on British Boar...

Newsletter: Share: