Shirley Tilghman
Molecular Biologist; Pres., Princeton University
01:24

Re: Who are you?

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Tilghman was born and grew up in Toronto, Canada. She feels that Canada's policies of putting the group before the individual has definitely influenced her. She also mentions that her father made a major impact on her life by supporting women's rights and encouraging her interest in math and science. Transcript:Shirley Tilghman


Shirley Tilghman

Shirley Tilghman is the nineteenth president of Princeton University, and is the first woman to hold the position. Tilghman served on the Princeton faculty for fifteen years before being named President. A native of Canada, Tilghman was educated at Queen's University and Temple University. She is a renowned molecular biologist, known particularly for her pioneering research in mammalian developmental genetics. She served as a member of the National Research Council's committee that set the blueprint for the U.S. effort in the Human Genome Project and was one of the founding members of the National Advisory Council of the Human Genome Project Initiative for the National Institutes of Health.

In 2002, Tilghman was one of five winners of the L'Oréal-UNESCO Award for Women in Science.  In the following year, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Developmental Biology, and in 2007, she was awarded the Genetics Society of America Medal for outstanding contributions to her field.  Tilghman is a member of the American Philosophical Society, the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the Royal Society of London. She chairs the Association of American Universities and serves as a trustee of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, and as a director of Google Inc.

Transcript
Question: Where are you from and how has that shaped you?

Transcript: I was born in Toronto, Canada. I think the biggest difference that I see between Canada and the United States where I currently live is the fundamental difference of whether the group rights are trumped by the individual, or whether the individual’s rights are trumped by the group. I think in Canada it is the former. And I think that has very much influenced who I am as a person.


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