Re: What must the Republicans do to win in 2008?

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David S. Broder is best known for the twice-weekly political column he writes for the Washington Post, where he has been on staff since 1966. Before joining the Post, he worked at the New York Times, the Congressional Quarterly,the now-defunct Washington Star and the Bloomington, IL Pantagraph. Broder appears as a frequent pundit on television programs such as Washington Week and Meet the Press. In addition to the Pulitzer, which he received in 1973, Broder was the receipient of the 1990 Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award and an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Colby College. He is the author and co-author of six books, most recently The System: The American Way of Politics at the Breaking Point, with Haynes Johnson(1996). Broder taught at Duke University from 1987-88. Since 2001, he has held a tenured professorship at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park. After receiving his AB in 1947 and his AM in 1951, both in Political Science, from the University of Chicago, Broder served in the United States Army for two years. Ideas recorded on: 9/13/07
  • Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

Well the challenge for the Republicans – and particularly for whoever emerges from that field as the nominee – is going to be to define for the American people how they would be different from the Bush administration. It’s pretty clear that Americans are ready to move on beyond, and in a different way from, where Bush has taken us. Republicans have the challenge because it’s much easier for Democrats to say, “We’re different. We were not part of that.” Republicans who have, at this point in the stage . . . in the campaign, mostly identify pretty closely with the Bush policies, will at some point have to separate from those policies if they’re going to have any chance of winning. Well with rare exceptions, there’s not a lot of eloquence so far in the American campaign. And the tendency to reduce everything to a sound bite – the willingness of the people who are formatting the debates, for example, to limit candidates to one minute or 30-second responses – it makes it almost impossible to . . . for people to have extended thoughts in graceful language. Recorded on: 9/13/07


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