Re: What do you believe?

Arthur Guseni Oliver Mutambara, a Zimbabwean political figure and scholar has served as the President of a faction of the Movement for Democratic Change since February 2006, a position previously held by secretary general Welshman Ncube. The Movement for Democratic Change split in 2005 after a dispute over whether or not to participate in Zimbabwean parliamentary election. Born May 25, 1966, Mutambara was a strong voice in the Zimbabwean student movement in 1988 and 1989, leading anti-government protests at the University of Zimbabwe, which led to his eventual arrest and detention. He continued his education as a Rhodes scholar at Merton College, Oxford in the United Kingdom, obtaining a Ph.D. in Robotics and Mechatronics. In his field he had taught at a number of universities in the United States including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has published three books on engineering including: Design and Analysis of Control Systems, Decentralized Estimation, and Control for Multisensor Systems and Mechatronics and Robotics. Additionally, he has served as a professor of Business Strategy and as a consultant for the management-consulting firm McKinsey & Company. Since September 2003 he has worked as the Managing Director and CEO of Africa Technology and Business Institute.

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TRANSCRIPT

I think my major philosophy is rooted in two aspects. The first aspect is that we should believe in institution building and not personalities. Institutions should be _______ our activities. All our activities must be based on institutions and not personalities. So in Africa our challenge is how do we build good institutions? How do you build a value system? And we should always depend on institutions and value systems; but it takes time to develop value systems. It takes time to build institutions; but there is no alternative to institution building and the development of a value system. The second piece of my philosophy is around science and technology – that we need to make sure we use science and technology as key drivers to bring about economic transformation, which then empowers our people economically so that their ________ conditions are improved in terms of access to health, access to education, access to jobs. The right to a job should be understood as a human right. And that there has to be some degree of equitable distribution of wealth so that the gap between the “haves” and the “have nots” is not draconian; but at the same time respecting the role of the market, competition, creativity, innovation. But there has to be an element of social justice that says inclusiveness – participatory democratic existence that says the people must participate in the economy. These are the ideas that drive my philosophy on the economy and around economics. It has to be a collective definition of a good life. The definition of a good life to me is a society, a world where the majority of the people have the fundamental, basic rights – freedom of association, freedom of assembly, freedom from poverty. A world where the right to a job is an economic right. A world where the lives of all human beings is meaningful. It doesn’t have to be a luxury. It’s meaningful. People are content. People have the basic needs. And we can’t . . . We’re not talking here about equal outcomes. We’re talking about equal opportunities. If we can guarantee equal opportunities to citizens of the globe, that will be a measure of success. Recorded On: 7/ 5/07

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