David Broder
Journalist, The Washington Post
01:45

Re: Can newspapers survive the digital revolution?

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Broder believes that we're seeing a transition, rather than a steady decline.

David Broder

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David S. Broder is best known for the twice-weekly political column he writes for the Washington Post, where he has been on staff since 1966. Before joining the Post, he worked at the New York Times, the Congressional Quarterly,the now-defunct Washington Star and the Bloomington, IL Pantagraph. Broder appears as a frequent pundit on television programs such as Washington Week and Meet the Press. In addition to the Pulitzer, which he received in 1973, Broder was the receipient of the 1990 Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award and an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Colby College. He is the author and co-author of six books, most recently The System: The American Way of Politics at the Breaking Point, with Haynes Johnson(1996). Broder taught at Duke University from 1987-88. Since 2001, he has held a tenured professorship at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park. After receiving his AB in 1947 and his AM in 1951, both in Political Science, from the University of Chicago, Broder served in the United States Army for two years. Ideas recorded on: 9/13/07
Transcript
I think that’s an open question. Our audience is clearly migrating – and pretty rapidly – from the print version to the Internet version. I’m inclined to think that this is a transition period and not just a steadily accelerating decline. Washington Post has had a smart strategy of building its web site and building revenue on the web site, so I think that we’re gonna be able to survive. Well I think the biggest problem is our economic question mark. Are people going to be willing to finance the kind of costly investment that it takes to produce quality journalism? That labor-intensive work. The two women who __________ the Washington Post who broke the story about the abuse of prisoners . . . of veterans at Walter Reed Hospital spent four months on that story. That’s very expensive to have two highly trained, professional reporters working for four months on one story. But that story produced an enormous change of policy. And the question mark is whether people are willing to support that kind of investment in quality journalism. Recorded on: 9/13/07


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