Pogue on the Internet

David Pogue is the personal-technology columnist for The New York Times. Each week, he contributes a print column, an e-mail column and an online video. In addition, he writes Pogue's Posts, one of The Times's most popular blogs.  David is also an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News, a frequent guest on NPR's "Morning Edition," and a regular on CNBC.

With over three million books in print, David is one of the world's best-selling how-to authors. He is the author or co-author of seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own line of complete, funny computer books, the Missing Manual series, which now includes 60 titles.

David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in music, and he spent 10 years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals.

He's been profiled on both "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes." In 2007, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in music from the Shenandoah Conservatory.

  • Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

David Pogue: One thing that’s been striking me is, how Neanderthal and crude our efforts at wireless are today. I firmly believe that I will be telling my grandchildren, “When I was your age, if I wanted to check my e-mail, I’d have to drive around town looking for a coffee shop. We had base stations in those days with 150-foot range. We did.”

It’s like it’s so obvious that wireless is going to be everywhere, like a cell phone is almost now. We’ll have our iPhones or our laptops and we’ll be able to check.

For your laptop now, you can get these really wonderful cards that get you onto the internet at pretty high speed wherever you can make a cell phone call, but it’s 60 bucks a month. It’s just still a niche thing for white-collar businessmen.

But I firmly believe that that will have to be the way we go. Wired stuff will still be good for the home, cable and DSL and so on, but I think the wireless is the area where we have the most advances yet to make.

Recorded on: May 15, 2008.


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