David Pogue
Technology Columnist, The New York Times
03:09

Pogue on Microsoft

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Microsoft has a lot of disincentive to break its mold.

David Pogue

David Pogue is the personal-technology columnist for The New York Times. Each week, he contributes a print column, an e-mail column and an online video. In addition, he writes Pogue's Posts, one of The Times's most popular blogs.  David is also an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News, a frequent guest on NPR's "Morning Edition," and a regular on CNBC.

With over three million books in print, David is one of the world's best-selling how-to authors. He is the author or co-author of seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own line of complete, funny computer books, the Missing Manual series, which now includes 60 titles.

David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in music, and he spent 10 years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals.

He's been profiled on both "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes." In 2007, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in music from the Shenandoah Conservatory.

Transcript

David Pogue: I would say that Microsoft has been an innovative company. They’ve done some really interesting things. Most of the things that they’ve tried to do that broke new ground have been horrible failures.

The SPOT Watch, a wristwatch that gets your e-mail, weather, sports, stocks, right on your wrist. The fact that it requires a monthly fee for your watch and it stops working when you leave your area code and the fact that you have to recharge it every single night, it never became a massive hit.

The Tablet PC; I remember Bill Gates saying at one trade show that in five years the Tablet PC would be the predominant kind of laptop, sort of innovative in its way. It found niches, healthcare, insurance, but is it 50 percent? No, it’s 5 percent.

The wireless screen, that was interesting. For a while they sold just a screen that communicated with the actual computer wirelessly. It died a horrible death. So they do try and they do innovate. You can’t say they’ve never innovated. They also do an awful lot of copying of other people though.

 

Recorded on May 15, 2008


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