Nancy Koehn
Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
03:46

Nancy Koehn On Women in Business

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Nancy Koehn on the secrets of female success

Nancy Koehn

Nancy F. Koehn, an authority on entrepreneurial history, is the James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. Koehn's research focuses on leading in turbulent times and the social and economic impact of entrepreneurship.

She is currently working on a book about the most important leadership lessons from Abraham Lincoln and another on social entrepreneurs.  Her upcoming book, The Story of American Business:  From the Pages of the New York Times (2009), sketches some of the most important people and moments from the last 150 years of U.S. business history.  Koehn's most recent book, Brand New: How Entrepreneurs Earned Consumers' Trust from Wedgwood to Dell (2001) examined six entrepreneurial visionaries who have created powerful brands and best-of-class companies in moments of great change.

Koehn consults with many companies on a range of issues including leadership development, effective brand stewardship, and customer relationship management.

Transcript

Topic: Women in Business

Nancy Koehn: First there's this explosion of women going into the entrepreneurial field if you will, or onto the entrepreneurial ocean and bravely sailing forth to create their own businesses and their own products. And I'm not just talking about women with rich educations and many, many sort of economic assets. I'm talking about women at all points along the social spectrum who are, you know, building beauty shops; setting up small schools for their kids; opening up new telecommunications ventures; creating a beauty company to sell to a larger beauty corporation; women doing astounding things all over the map for a variety of reasons not the least of which is being their own boss and having control of their time. But women are now starting in this country more businesses than men by some measure. And that's interesting, and exciting, and different than the past.

Recorded On: 6/12/07

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