Nadine Strossen
Former President, ACLU; Professor of Law; New York Law School
02:40

Nadine Strossen: How do we combat terror without violating civil rights?

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We do what we've always done: use our criminal justice system.

Nadine Strossen

Nadine Strossen has written, lectured, and practiced extensively in the areas of constitutional law, civil liberties, and international human rights. From 1991 through 2008 she served as president of the American Civil Liberties Union, the first woman to head the nation’s largest and oldest civil liberties organization. Professor Strossen retains leadership positions with the ACLU as a member of its National Advisory Council and Co-Chair of its Campaign for the Future.

The National Law Journal has twice named Professor Strossen one of “The 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America.” In 1996, Working Woman Magazine listed her among the “350 Women Who Changed the World 1976–1996.” In 1997, Upside Magazine included her in the “Elite 100: 100 Executives Leading The Digital Revolution.” In 1998, Vanity Fair Magazine included Professor Strossen in “America’s 200 Most Influential Women.” In 1999, Ladies’ Home Journal included her in “America’s 100 Most Important Women.” In 2005, Professor Strossen was honored by the University of Tulsa College of Law and the Tulsa Law Review, which made her scholarly work the subject of their Fifth Annual Legal Scholarship Symposium titled “Nadine Strossen: Scholar as Activist.”

Professor Strossen’s writings have been published in many scholarly and general interest publications (more than 250 published works). Her book, Defending Pornography: Free Speech, Sex, and the Fight for Women’s Rights (Scribner, 1995), was named by The New York Times as a “Notable Book” of 1995 and was republished in 2000 by NYU Press, with a new introduction by the author. Her coauthored book, Speaking of Race, Speaking of Sex: Hate Speech, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties (NYU Press, 1995), was named an “outstanding book” by the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America.

Professor Strossen graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard College (1972) and magna cum laude from Harvard Law School (1975), where she was an editor of the Harvard Law Review. Before becoming a law professor, she practiced law for nine years in Minneapolis (her hometown) and New York City.

Transcript

Question: How do we combat terror without violating civil rights?

Nadine Strossen: We do what we have always done…we use our criminal justice system, which is very effective. I mean one of the points that the ACLU has been making over and over again, we started on 09/11 itself by saying, creating a safe and free campaign is to belie this assumption that is not at all demonstrated in reality that somehow you have to choose between protecting civil liberties, human rights on the one hand and national security on the other hand. Nothing can be further from the truth. If you look at the…because the black hole of Guantanamo we have not had to this date a single prosecution of anybody who is even alleged to have any connection to the 09/11 terrorist attacks and then you look…so this is parallel system of lawless detention without access to courts with no access to lawyers, military commissions, and then you have the criminal justice system in the United States where we have a proven track record of putting away terrorists for years including terrorists post 09/11 and it is really interesting if you look at what has been sad and written by judges and prosecutors in that system. They say that is the most effective way and we haven’t revealed state secrets because there is a Classified Information Protection Act. There are methods for protecting jurors and other who are involved in the case and there have been terrorists who have been put away for the rest of their lives. So, they are being prevented from returning to the battlefield and they are also being prevented from being turned into victims or murderers the way those in Guantanamo are, who then just become posters for recruiting more people to Al Qaeda. We have our top military and intelligence officials have been saying this so called war on terror is really a war of ideas where the United States needs the moral authority and in Guantanamo and the military commissions, we are squandering our moral authority providing fodder for Al Qaeda to go out and recruit more terrorists and we haven’t achieved a single conviction. This is the worst of all possible worlds.

 

 

Recorded On: 2/14/08


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