Matt Miller
Senior Fellow, Center For American Progress
01:27

Matt Miller Advises College Graduates

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The author says the ambiguity of changing jobs is something college graduates should be comfortable with.

Matt Miller

Matt Miller is a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress; a contributing editor at Fortune; and the host of "Left, Right & Center," public radio's popular week-in-review program. Miller's first book, The Two Percent Solution: Fixing America's Problems In Ways Liberals And Conservatives Can Love, was published in 2003, and was a Los Angeles Times bestseller. His latest book, The Tyranny Of Dead Ideas, was published by Henry Holt/Times Books in January 2009. Miller served as Senior Advisor to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget from 1993 to 1995. He lives with his family in Los Angeles.

Transcript

Question: What do college graduates need to know starting their professional lives?

Miller:    Obviously, get the best education you can.  I guess the one thing I would counsel is you’ve got to realize you’re probably going to change jobs, who knows, a dozen times, 20 times over your career.  You may be reinventing yourself a number of times, and so, one of the biggest things you have to do is first have some comfort with that ambiguity, because that’s different than your father’s or grandfather’s career.  I think careers are just going to look different.  Then I think, you know, another thing is I would want them to be awakened politically enough to get government policies that help make that kind of life, which is now going to more prevalent in the new economic era that we’re entering, something that’s consistent with some sense of security, which people want.  You know, what we’re going through, we’re going through a new moment in the history of American capitalism, where a lot of these old rules don’t make sense, and young people who were going to be the most affected by this in their future really need to get in the game politically so that leaders hear what their demands are for the kind of security amidst change that could make it work for what normal people want.


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